ITT Tech Student Loan Forgiveness

Great news for anyone who attend an ITT school – virtually all student loans taken out to pay for courses and degree programs at ITT Tech and any of their affiliated schools are being forgiven by the Federal Government, via the recently announced ITT Tech Student Loan Discharge Program.

This program operates under the Federal Government’s long-existing Closed School Loan Discharge Program, which allows students to have their debt forgiven if the school shut down before they were able to complete their degree program, and it applies not just to ITT Tech students, but to students from ALL colleges and universities across the country.

Who is Eligible for ITT Tech Loan Forgiveness?

Anyone who attended an ITT school that closed down while you were still attending, or “soon” after you withdrew from the school, and who did NOT complete their program may be eligible for student loan forgiveness via the closed school discharge program.

Closed School Discharges offer up to 100% forgiveness on the balance of any Federal Direct Loans, Federal Family Education Loans (FEEL Loans) and Federal Perkins Loans that were taken out to pay for services at the school which closed.

But what’s even better is that you are also eligible for a reimbursement for all money that you’ve already paid the Federal Government for the services provided to you by ITT Tech or any of its related schools.

If you qualify for an ITT Tech Closed School Loan Discharge, you may have tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars coming your way!

Eligibility Requirements For ITT Tech Closed School Loan Discharges

The eligibility requirements for ITT Closed School Discharges are quite simple. Basically – you had to be attending one of the ITT schools that shut down while it shut down, or have withdrawn from the school within 120 days of the shutdown.

Here are the details in a handy bullet-point list format:

  • You must have attended one of the 132 ITT schools who are shutting down, and you cannot have already completed the educational program you were enrolled in at ITT.
  • You must have outstanding student loan debt from one of the following Federal student loan forgiveness programs: Direct Loans, FEEL Loans, or Perkins Loans.
  • Your IIT school must have closed while you were still enrolled – OR – your ITT school must have closed within 120 days after you withdrew from the program.

As long as you satisfy the above requirements, you’ll eligible to receive an ITT loan discharge.

How Do I Apply For An ITT Tech Closed School Discharge?

First, you’re going to need to get and fill out the official “Closed School Loan Discharge Application”, which you can request from your loan servicer, or which you can download here.

After you’ve filled out the form and sent it to your loan servicer (you can provide it to them via snail mail, email, FTP, or however else they tell you is acceptable – contact them first to find out what processes they support), then you’ll have to wait for their response to see if your application is approved.

It’s seriously that simple! Get the form, fill it out, contact your loan servicer to ask how to submit it, then send it to them. DONE!

Where Can I Download the ITT Closed School Discharge Application Form?

Get it here.

Please note that this is the OFFICIAL United States Government form for the Loan Discharge Application for School Closures.

In order to receive your discharge and have your debt forgiven, you’ll need to fill this out completely and send it to whoever services your loans.

How Do I Find Out Who My Loan Servicer Is?

There’s two easy ways to do this:

  1. Login to the My Federal Student Aid website, here.
  2. Call 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243, or if you’re hearing impaired: 1-800-730-8913)

After you’ve provided your information to either the website, or over the phone, you’ll be told who services your loan so you can get their contact information so you can call them and find out where to submit your Closed School Discharge Form.

State Tuition Recovery Fund Refunds

Anyone impacted by the closure of ITT schools may also be eligible to receive money back from their state, via a program known as the State Tuition Recovery Fund.

To find out if you’re eligible for a refund via this program, you need to contact your state’s “Postsecondary Education Agency”.

Google your state name, plus that phrase (example: “California Postsecondary Education Agency“, and you’ll find out who they are and be able to sort out whether or not you’re eligible for additional refunds.

Your Other Option: Credit Transfers

Some people impacted by the closure of their ITT Tech School will undoubtedly want to continue with their education elsewhere, and it’s possible to retain the credits you earned from ITT and simply apply them to another school with a similar program.

If you choose to keep your ITT credits (getting the Closed School Discharge does require sacrificing them), then you’ll have to work with the new school to make sure they will actually approve the ITT course work you completed to decide if you can receive credit for what you’ve already done.

Once the new school has determined what credit you can receive, they’ll sort out what courses you need to complete at their institution in order to complete your program.

The Department of Education is working with ITT Tech’s officials and the reps from other schools, as well as state licensing and postsecondary education agencies from each state, to help go through ITT student academic records from all 135 closed schools to sort out how to determine which students will remain eligible for continued federal student aid funding.

Right now though, it’s basically a huge mess and nobody knows exactly how this part of the process will turn out, so if I were you, unless you were well into a program (nearing completion) I’d strongly consider taking the Closed School Discharge rather than attempting to transfer any credits elsewhere.

There is simply no telling how other schools will respond to ITT’s coursework – you may not get approval for ANY of your credits from ITT, so why take the risk if you can get a full refund?

Frequently Asked Questions

Everyone impacted by the closure of ITT’s campuses (all 136 of them) is trying to figure out their options, and many great questions have already been asked of the Department of Education.

Below you’ll find some of the most popular questions, with answers about how to proceed. Hopefully these will help you sort out your own strategy for dealing with ITT’s closure.

My School Closed and I Lost Eligibility for Federal Student Aid Funds. What Can I Do?

The Department of Education says that you have two options: you can either apply for the closed school loan discharge (explained on this page), or apply to transfer your ITT credits to other educational institutions.

For most students, applying for the discharge is likely to be a tempting offer, but for anyone who came close to completing their degree program, and especially for those students who came close and didn’t rack up much debt, a credit transfer may be the better option.

Which ITT Campuses Are Closing Down?

All of them! 136 ITT Technical Institute schools are closing, and if you attend any of their campuses, yours is either already shut down, or going to shut down soon.

ITT Educational Services, Inc. does own another chain of schools called the “Daniel Webster College”, which will continue to operate as normal, but all “ITT” schools are shutting down.

Can I Finish My ITT Program?

No, you will not be able to finish your program at an ITT school.

However, you may be eligible to transfer your ITT credits to another educational institution where you can receive credit for whatever work you’ve already completed, then work toward completing their similar program and getting your degree, certificate, or whatever it was that you were working on.

To find out if your credits are eligible for transfer, you’ll need to contact the new school, provide them with transcripts from the ITT school, and see if they’ll accept it. There’s a chance that all, or none, of your ITT work is transferable, so this is a bit of a gamble.

How Can I Get A Copy Of My ITT Transcript?

Before the ITT schools close down completely, they’re required to provide access to your academic records, and to make them accessible indefinitely (meaning forever).

Since this is all literally going down right now as I type this, there’s no information about how to access your transcripts yet, but the best way to find out how to get them will be to contact your state’s postsecondary education agency, or to look at whatever information your ITT school sent you over email when they explained the closure.

How Can I Get Details About How Much Aid I’ve Already Received?

You’ll need to login to the My Federal Student Aid Website, where you can find a complete record of the amount of money you’ve received in federal aid (student loans and other financial assistance programs, like grants, etc.).

What Does It Mean To Get a Loan Discharge?

It means that you won’t have to pay back any more of the debt that you owed on your student loan, and that you’ll get a refund for any payments you made previously, either voluntarily or through forced collection processes (like wage garnishments, etc.).

It also means that your discharge will get reported to all the major credit bureaus, so if you had any negative activity on your credit report that was related to the debt, it’ll disappear and your credit will be repaired.

If I Transferred From ITT And Finished A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PROGRAM At A New School – Am I Still Eligible To Have My ITT Loans Forgiven?

Yes you are!

If the program you studied at the new school is considered to be completely different from whatever you were studying at ITT (that probably means you couldn’t have transferred any related credits from ITT to the new school), then you’ll be able to get your ITT loans discharged.

You won’t be able to get a discharge for the loans related to the new school, but at least without the ITT debt you’ll be able to save some significant cash.

What Is The Deadline For Applying For An ITT Discharge?

There isn’t one.

I Think ITT (or another school) Defrauded Me – What Can I Do?

If you’re worried about fraud committed by ITT – don’t worry – because your closed school discharge will wipe out the related debt anyway.

If you’re worried about being defrauded by another school, then check out my page about the Borrower Defense Against Repayment Program, which operates similarly to the Closed School Loan Discharge Program, and offers complete Federal Student Loan Forgiveness benefits.

Where Can I Ask Other Questions?

Feel free to ask away in the comments section below, and I’ll do my best to get you a response as soon as possible.

Alternatively, contact whoever services your loan to ask about their processes and your eligibility, or call the free Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID.

Finally, if you’re looking to have someone else handle the application processes for you, then consider calling the Student Aid Relief Helpline at 1-888-906-3065.

This is paid service that will charge you to take care of collecting your information, filling out all the require application forms and submitting them on your behalf, but for those of you who don’t have time, or don’t want to deal with that process, it may be worth using.

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Tim's experience battling crushing student loan debt led him to create the website Forget Student Loan Debt, where he offers advice on dealing with excessive student loans and advocates a cautious approach to funding education costs via borrowed money.